Step Modifiers are powerful, flexible tools that add specific behaviors to any step, allowing you to create complex and creative patterns.

Click on the square pane above each step to reveal the Step Modifier menu, then make a selection from the 5 fly-out menus.

None

“None” is the default state and no Step Modifiers are applied. If a Step Modifier is selected, you can select “None” to clear it.

Transpose

You can select the Transpose value by choosing the number of half steps the played note will be transposed up or down.
Range: +/- 24 half steps

When a Transpose modifier is selected, the transposition value will be displayed in blue.

Slide

You can select the Slide value by choosing the number of half steps the played note will bend up or down in a step, allowing you to create TB-303-style pitch slides as part of the arpeggiation. The speed at which the bends occur is set by moving the Rate Slider above the Slide value—all the way left is the fastest and all the way right is the slowest. Slide is the only Step Modifier that can be used multiple times over the length of a multi-step note, allowing for legato slides.
Range: +/- 24 half steps

Slide uses Pitch Bend messages to create the pitch slides. Once you engage Slide, Omnisphere’s Pitch Bend range is automatically changed to +/- 24 half steps. The Pitch Bend messages can be recorded using the Capture feature. When using captured MIDI Arpeggiator data with another instrument, make sure the Pitch Bend range on that device or VI is set to +/- 24 half steps.

NOTE: Slides are always relative to the played note.

Chord

When a Chord Modifier is applied to a step, that step will play a chord (some or all of the notes held in the pattern, depending on the selected modifier).

Chord Modifier Types

There are 9 Chord Modifier Types:

  • Chord
    Plays all held notes.
  • Chord Voicing 1
    Plays only the odd-numbered notes in the held chord.
    E.G. If you play a 6 note chord, it will play a chord comprised of the 1st, 3rd, and 5th notes.
  • Chord Voicing 2
    Plays only the even-numbered notes in the held chord.
    E.G. If you play a 6 note chord, it will play a chord comprised of the 2nd, 4th, and 6th notes.
  • Chord Inversion +1
    Plays the first inversion of the chord.

    E.G. if you play C3-E3-G3, it will play E3-G3-C4.
 If you play C3-E3-A3-D4, it will play E3-A3-C4-D4.
  • Chord Inversion +2
    Plays the second inversion of the chord.

    E.G. if you play C3-E3-G3-B3, it will play G3-B3-C4-E4.
  • Chord Inversion +3
    Plays the third inversion of the chord.

    E.G. if you play C3-E3-G3-A3, it will play A3-C4-E4-G4.
  • Chord Inversion -1
    This is similar to Chord Inversion +1, but inverts downward one chord step instead.

    E.G. if you play C3-E3-G3, it will play G2-C3-E3.
  • Chord Inversion -2
    Inverts downward two chord steps.
    E.G. if you play C3-E3-G3, it will play E2-G2-C3.
  • Chord Inversion -3
    Inverts downward three chord steps.
    E.G. if you play C3-E3-G3, it will play C2-E2-G2.

Hi-Low

  • Lowest
    The modifier will ignore the Arpeggiator mode and always play the lowest held note.
  • Highest
    The modified step will ignore the Arpeggiator mode and always play the highest held note.

Step Dividers

  • Step Divider 2
    This modifier divides the step into 2 equal parts and triggers the same note twice.
    E.G. If the step was supposed to play one 8th-note on C4, it will play two 16th-notes on C4 in the same time.
  • Step Divider 3
    Divides the step into 3 equal parts.
  • Step Divider 4
    Divides the step into 4 equal parts.
  • Step Divider 2 Rise
    Divides the step into 2 equal parts that play with an increasing velocity.
  • Step Divider 3 Rise
    Divides the step into 3 equal parts that play with an increasing velocity.
  • Step Divider 4 Rise
    Divides the step into 4 equal parts that play with an increasing velocity.
  • Step Divider 2 Fall
    Divides the step into 2 equal parts that play with a decreasing velocity.
  • Step Divider 3 Fall
    Divides the step into 3 equal parts that play with a decreasing velocity.
  • Step Divider 4 Fall
    Divides the step into 4 equal parts that play with a decreasing velocity.

NOTE: Step dividers can be applied to tied notes. For example, if four 16th-note steps are tied and a Step Divider 3 is used, it’s possible to add irregular rhythms to the pattern.

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